UBC Press announces “Everyday Exposure: Indigenous Mobilization and Environmental Justice in Canada’s Chemical Valley”

everyday-exposure-book-cover-_for-blog-postUBC Press is pleased to announce the publication of Everyday Exposure by Sarah Marie Wiebe.
Everyday Exposure documents the adverse health effects experienced by Aamjiwnaang citizens in the heart of Canada’s Chemical Valley and argues for a transformative and experiential “sensing policy” approach that takes the voices and experiences of Indigenous citizens seriously.

The paperback is now available for course use; it is not yet released to the general public. Should this book be of interest to you or another member of your faculty for course consideration, please complete the secure online exam copy request form; it is not necessary to enter a discount code, simply click the ‘Order in Canada’ button. Your courier address, including phone number is required for shipping.
Should you wish to purchase the paperback of this title for professional development purposes, please fill out and return by mail, fax, or e-mail our advance paperback order form [pdf]
ABOUT THE BOOK
Near the Ontario-Michigan border, Canada’s densest concentration of chemical manufacturing surrounds the Aamjiwnaang First Nation. Living in the polluted heart of Chemical Valley, members of this Indigenous community express concern about a declining rate of male births in addition to abnormal rates of miscarriage, asthma, cancer, and cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses.
While starvation policies and smallpox-laced blankets might be an acknowledged part of Canada’s past, this book reveals how the colonial legacy of inflicting harm on Indigenous bodies persists through a system that fails to adequately address health and ecological suffering in First Nations communities.
Everyday Exposure uncovers the systemic injustices faced on a daily basis in Aamjiwnaang. By exploring the problems that Canada’s conflicting levels of jurisdiction pose for the creation of environmental justice policy, analyzing clashes between Indigenous and scientific knowledge, and documenting the experiences of Aamjiwnaang residents as they navigate their toxic environment, this book argues that social and political change requires an experiential and transformative “sensing policy” approach, one that takes the voices of Indigenous citizens seriously.


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